GLOBESITY FOUNDATION – Healthy Life Bootcamp

Home » Xanthan Effects on Weight Reduction, Cravings and Diabetes in GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the Obese

Xanthan Effects on Weight Reduction, Cravings and Diabetes in GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the Obese

Xanthan Effects on Weight Reduction, Cravings and Diabetes in GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the Obese

Authors: Marcus Free MD, Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi MD, Waqar Ahmad PhD, Kelly Daly RDN, and Don Juravin (Don Karl Juravin).

Abstract (Research Summary)

  • Xanthan is a natural polysaccharide produced by a fermentation process using Xanthomonas campestris (Katzbauer, 1998; Hassler, 1990; Jansson, 1975).
  • Xanthan causes significant weight loss, and works synergistically with Konjac making their combined weight loss effect >6.6 lbs (3 kg) per month, and >79 lbs (36 kg) per year (Challen, 1994; Birketvedt, 2005).
  • Xanthan (12 g to 14.5 g daily) lowers fasting glucose by 38% and postprandial serum glucose  by 31% to 37% (Osilesi, 1985; Braaten, 1991).
  • Xanthan reduces postprandial glucose by 13% when given alone and by 36% when combined with Beta glucan (Paquin, 2013).
  • Xanthan increases satiety and inhibits the synthesis of hormones related to cravings, such as ghrelin and neuropeptide Y (Osilesi, 1985; Slavin, 2007; Ranadheera, 2010).

Overview

Xanthan is naturally made from glucose obtained from grains such as maize, soy, wheat, and lactose. It’s created when sugar is fermented by a type of bacteria called Xanthomonas campestris. A polysaccharide commonly used as a food additive. 

Xanthan is an indigestible soluble fiber, which absorbs water and turns into a gel-like substance, slowing down digestion. It controls sugar entry to the bloodstream and decreasing blood sugar spikes. Xanthan aids in weight loss by increasing satiety, lowering bad cholesterol, claiming to have cancer-fighting properties, improving regularity, and used as a saliva substitute.

Xanthan Effects On Weight Reduction

Xanthan Effects on Weight Reduction

Xanthan causes weight loss and works synergistically with Konjac making their combined weight loss effect >6.6 lbs (3 kg) per month, and >79 lbs (36 kg) per year (Challen 1994, Birketvedt 2005).

  • Xanthan and Konjac have strong synergistic interactions making their combined weight loss effect much stronger than working by themselves (Challen, 1994). As Konjac reduces weight by up to 6.6 lbs (3 kg) per month, or up to 79 lbs (36 kg) per year when used before meals (Birketvedt, 2005), the combination of Xanthan with Konjac would result in greater weight loss.
  • Xanthan increases satiety (Osilesi, 1985; Slavin, 2007). Inducing satiety causes less food intake and weight loss.

Xanthan Effects on Cravings

Xanthan decreases cravings by lowering postprandial glucose by 38%, increasing healthy gut flora by 1000%, and inhibiting the synthesis of hormones directly related to cravings, such as ghrelin and neuropeptide Y.

  • Xanthan increases satiety and improves glucose levels resulting in reduced cravings (Osilesi, 1985; Braaten, 1991).
  • Xanthan lowers postprandial glucose by 38% (Osilesi, 1985; Braaten, 1991). Reduced blood glucose levels result in increased satiety and therefore minimizes cravings.
  • Xanthan reduces cravings by promoting the growth of bifidobacteria up to 10 times, resulting in an improved ratio of healthy to unhealthy gut flora (Mitsuoka, 1987; Logan 2005).
  • Xanthan increases satiety and inhibits the synthesis of hormones related to cravings, such as ghrelin and neuropeptide Y (Osilesi, 1985; Slavin, 2007; Ranadheera, 2010).

Xanthan Effects on Diabetes

Xanthan decreases fasting and postprandial serum glucose by 31% to 38% by increasing the viscosity of the small intestine, limiting glucose absorption, and improving insulin sensitivity.

  • Xanthan (12 g to 14.5 g daily) lowers fasting glucose by 38% and postprandial blood glucose by 31% to 37%. It also reduces postprandial insulin (Osilesi, 1985; Braaten, 1991). Controlled glucose levels are particularly important for diabetics to avoid hypoglycemia which often results in sugar cravings and weight gain.
  • Xanthan lowers postprandial serum glucose levels and improves insulin sensitivity. It also increases the viscosity of small intestine content which results in decreased blood glucose concentration (Ou, 2001; Braaten, 1991).
  • Xanthan enriched juice reduces postprandial glucose by 13% and the effect is increased (by 36%) when Xanthan is mixed with Beta glucan (Paquin, 2013).

Side Effects and Drug Interactions

Xanthan is Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) according to FDA.

Side Effects

  • Flatulence and Bloating: Xanthan may increase intestinal and gut gas production resulting in increased flatulence and bloating.

Drug Interactions

  • Antidiabetic drugs: As both Xanthan and antidiabetic drugs decrease blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels and speak to a physician about decreasing the antidiabetic drugs if required.

Interaction With Foods

None known

Interaction With Lab Tests

  • Blood Glucose: Xanthan might lower blood glucose test results (Osilesi, 1985).
  • Cholesterol: Xanthan might lower serum cholesterol test results (Osilesi, 1985).

Caution

  • Pregnancy and breastfeeding: There is limited research and therefore best to avoid during pregnancy or breastfeeding.
  • Diabetes: As Xanthan lowers blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels to avoid hypoglycemic episodes.
  • Nausea, vomiting, appendicitis, fecal impaction, intestinal obstruction, intestinal narrowing or undiagnosed abdominal pain: As Xanthan is a bulk forming laxative, it can be harmful if used when these conditions exist.
  • Surgery: Xanthan gum might affect blood glucose levels and might interfere with blood glucose control during and after surgical procedures. Patients should discontinue xanthan gum at least 2 weeks before elective surgical procedures.

References 

  1. Tanaka, H., Nishikawa, Y., Kure, K., Tsuda, K., & Hokosama, M. (2018). The Addition of Xanthan Gum to Enteral Nutrition Suppresses Postprandial Glycemia in Humans. Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, 64(4), 284–286. doi:10.3177/jnsv.64.284  [Accessed 28.07.2016].
  2. Birketvedt, G., Shimshi, M., Thom, E., et al (2005). Experiences with three different fiber supplements in weight reduction. Medical Science Monitor [online], 11 (1), pp. 15-8. Available from: http://www.medscimonit.com/download/index/idArt/13883 [Accessed 12.05.2016].
  3. Braaten, J., Wood, P., Scott, F., et al. (1991). Oat gum lowers glucose and insulin after an oral glucose load. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [online], 53 (6), pp. 1425-30. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1852092?dopt=Abstract [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 
  4. Challen, I. (1994). Xanthan Gum: A Multifunctional Stabiliser for Food Products. Food Hydrocolloids [online], pp. 135-40. Available from: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4615-2486-1_17 [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 
  5. Hassler, R., Doherty, D. (1990). Genetic Engineering of Polysaccharide Structure: Production of Variants of Xanthan Gum in Xanthomonas campestris. Biotechnology Progress [online], 6 (3), pp. 182-7. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1021/bp00003a003/full [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 
  6. Jansson, P., Kenne, L., Lindberg, B. (1975). Structure of the extracellular polysaccharide from xanthomonas campestris. Carbohydrate Research [online], 45 (1), pp. 275-82. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0008621500858851 [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 
  7. Katzbauer, B. (1998). Properties and applications of xanthan gum. Polymer Degradation and Stability [online], 59 (1-3), pp. 81-4. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141391097001808 [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 
  8. Logan, A., Katzman, M. (2005). Major depressive disorder: probiotics may be an adjuvant therapy. Medical Hypotheses [online], 64 (3), pp. 533-8. Avaiable from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987704004967 [Acessed 30.05.2016].
  9. Mitsuoka, T., Hidaka, H., Eida, T. (1987). Effect of fructo-oligosaccharides on intestinal microflora. Food/Nahrung [online], 31 (5‐6), pp.427-36. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/food.19870310528/abstract [Accessed 27.05.2016].
  10. Osilesi, O., Trout, D., Glover, E., et al. (1985). Use of xanthan gum in dietary management of diabetes mellitus. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [online], 42 (4), pp. 597-603. Available from: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/42/4/597.short [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 
  11. Ou, S., Kwok, K., Fu, L. (2001). In Vitro Study of Possible Role of Dietary Fiber in Lowering Postprandial Serum Glucose. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry [online], 49 (2), pp. 1026-9. Available from: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/jf000574n [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 
  12. Paquin, J., Bedard, A., Lemieux, S., et al. (2013). Effects of juices enriched with xanthan and β-glucan on the glycemic response and satiety of healthy men. Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism [online], 38 (4), pp. 410-4. Available from: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/apnm-2012-0207#.Vx6AzzArI2y [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 
  13. Ranadheera, R., Baines, S., Adams, M. (2010). Importance of food in probiotic efficacy. Food Research International [online], 43 (1), pp. 1-7. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996909002749 [Accessed 27.05.2016].
  14. Slavin, J., Green, H. (2007). Dietary fibre and satiety. Nutrition Bulletin [online], 32 (s1), pp. 32-42. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-3010.2007.00603.x/full [Accessed 25.04.2016]. 

Footnote

This research was sponsored by GLOBESITY FOUNDATION (nonprofit organization) and managed by Don Juravin. GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the obese is part of GLOBESITY FOUNDATION which helps obese with 70 to 400 lbs excess fat to adopt a healthy lifestyle and thereby achieve a healthy weight.

Tags: xanthan, weight reduction, GLOBESITY FOUNDATION, weight loss, cravings, diabetes, healthy weight

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3970962