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Green Camellia Sinensis Effects on Weight Reduction, Cravings and Diabetes in GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the Obese

Effects of Green Camellia Sinensis on Weight Reduction

Authors: Marcus Free MD, Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi MD, Waqar Ahmad PhD, Kelly Daly RDN, and Don Juravin (Don Karl Juravin).

Abstract (Research Summary)

  • Green Camellia Sinensis (aka Green Tea Leaf Extract, active ingredient: Epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG) is grown predominantly in Asian countries and is well known for its weight loss and fat burning effects.
  • Green Camellia Sinensis consumption decreases body weight by 4.6% and waist circumference by 4.5% over 3 months through the inhibition of lipase and stimulation of thermogenesis (Chantre 2002). In an average 118 kg (260 lbs) individual with a waist of 100 cm (39.4 inches), this is a weight loss of 5.4 kg (12 lbs) and a waist reduction of 4.5 cm (1.7 inches).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis (625mg) consumption enhances exercise-induced changes in abdominal fat by decreasing total abdominal fat by 7.7% and subcutaneous abdominal fat by 6.2% over 12 weeks (Maki 2009). In an average 188 kg (260 lb) individual, this is total abdominal fat loss of 9 kg (19.8 lbs) and subcutaneous fat loss of 7.3 kg (16 lbs).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis reduces fat absorption as well as lipogenesis (formation of fat), resulting in decreased weight gain and increased weight loss (Wolfram 2006).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis is proven to reduce food intake by interacting with a component of a leptin-independent appetite control pathway which also causes cravings (Kao 2000).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis possesses antidiabetic activity, whereby it improves glucose metabolism and reduces blood glucose levels (Tsuneki 2004, Gomes 1995, Wolfram 2006).

Green Camellia Sinensis Effects on Weight Reduction

Green Camellia Sinensis decreases body weight (by 4.6%), abdominal fat (by 7.7%), and waist circumference (by 4.5%) as a result of increased thermogenesis and fat oxidation. In an average individual of 118 kg (260 lbs), this is a weight loss of 5.4 kg (12 lbs) and abdominal fat loss of 9 kg (20 lbs).

  • Green Camellia Sinensis consumption decreases body weight by 4.6% and waist circumference by 4.5% over 3 months through the inhibition of lipase and stimulation of thermogenesis (Chantre 2002). In an average 118 kg (260 lbs) individual with a waist of 100 cm (39.4 inches), this is a weight loss of 5.4 kg (12 lbs) and a waist reduction of 4.5 cm (1.7 inches).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis (625mg) consumption enhances exercise-induced changes in abdominal fat by decreasing total abdominal fat by 7.7% and subcutaneous abdominal fat by 6.2% over 12 weeks (Maki 2009). In an average 188 kg (260 lb) individual, this is a total abdominal fat loss of 9 kg (19.8 lbs) and subcutaneous fat loss of 7.3 kg (16 lbs).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis improves fat oxidation (by 17%) and reduces fat absorption and lipogenesis (formation of fat), resulting in increased weight loss (Wolfram 2006, Venables 2008).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis reduces food intake, body weight, body fat, waist circumference, and respiratory quotient, and increases resting energy expenditure (Westerterp-Plantenga 2005, Wolfram 2006, Sayama 1999, Cabrera 2006). These effects are proposed to be due to increased thermogenesis and fat oxidation (Westerterp-Plantenga 2005, Dulloo 2000).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis consumption decreases body weight and the weight regain after a period of weight loss (Hursel 2009, Sayama 1999).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis decreases the inflammation of adipocytes and enhances the metabolism of lipids, resulting in weight loss (Bose 2008, Sayama 1999).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis (140mg) consumption increases 24-hour energy expenditure by 4% (Dulloo 1999). For an average daily energy expenditure of 2,000 calories for a 118 kg (260 lb) individual, this is an additional 80 calories burned each day with no further dietary or exercise changes.
  • Green Camellia Sinensis consumption not only increases thermogenesis and lipid oxidation to improve weight loss, but it also limits weight regain following weight loss (Kovacs 2004, Westerterp-Plantenga 2005, Sayama 1999).

Green Camellia Sinensis Effects on Cravings

Green Camellia Sinensis decreases cravings by improving insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, protecting brain centers sensitive to dopamine and serotonin from oxidative stress and stabilizing mood. 

  • Green Camellia Sinensis improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism (Kao 2000, Potenza 2007), therefore reducing rapid rise and falls in serum glucose, resulting in decreased cravings (Ludwig 2002).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis reduces food intake by interacting with a component of a leptin-independent appetite control pathway which also causes cravings (Kao 2000).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis protects brain centers that are sensitive to serotonin and dopamine, thereby inhibiting cravings by making the centers more sensitive to these transmitters (Serafini 1996, Skrzydlewska 2002, Zhu 2012).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis contains a unique amino acid, L-theanine, which stabilizes mood and reduces depression and cravings for food (Juneja 1999).

Green Camellia Sinensis Effects on Diabetes

Green Camellia Sinensis decreases the risk of diabetes (by 33%) by reducing HbA1C levels, improving glucose metabolism, and increasing insulin sensitivity by 13%.

  • Green Camellia Sinensis possesses antidiabetic activity, whereby it improves glucose metabolism and reduces blood glucose levels (Tsuneki 2004, Gomes 1995, Wolfram 2006, Kao 2000).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis consumption decreases the risk of diabetes (by 33%) by decreasing HbA1C levels in those with borderline diabetes (Hiroyasu 2006, Fukino 2008).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis increases the sensitivity of insulin (by 13%) and glucose tolerance, resulting in improved uptake of blood glucose by cells and normalized blood glucose levels (Potenza 2007, Venables 2008).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis may ameliorate nephropathy in diabetic hypertensive individuals (Ribaldo 2008).

Benefits, Side Effects, Drug Interactions

Benefits

  • Green Camellia Sinensis exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by enhancing the effectiveness of ascorbic acid (Min 2006, Stagg 1975), which acts as an antioxidant, inhibits angiotensin-converting enzyme (lowering blood pressure), has a hypocholesterolemic action, and inhibits the growth of implanted malignant cells (Hattori 1990).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis (625mg) decreases serum triglyceride (by 5.9%) when combined with ≥180 minutes of exercise per week (Maki 2009).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis is anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic (Benelli 2002, Weisburger 2002, Serafini 1996), and prevents cardiac disorders too (Tsuneki 2004).
  • Green Camellia Sinensis significantly reduces cholesterol and triglycerides (Kao 2000).

Safety

Green Camellia Sinensis is Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) according to FDA.

Side effects

  • Stomach upset: Green Camellia Sinensis may cause an unpleasant sensation in the stomach.
  • Bowel motions: Green Camellia Sinensis may cause constipation.

Drug interactions

  • Antidiabetic drugs: As both Green Camellia Sinensis and anti-diabetic drugs decrease blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels and speak to a physician about decreasing the antidiabetic drugs if required.

Caution

  • Diabetes: As Green Camellia Sinensis lowers blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels to avoid hypoglycemic episodes. 

References

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Footnote

This research was sponsored by GLOBESITY FOUNDATION (nonprofit organization) and managed by Don Juravin. GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the obese is part of GLOBESITY FOUNDATION which helps obese with 70 to 400 lbs excess fat to adopt a healthy lifestyle and thereby achieve a healthy weight.

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