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Fibersol Effects on Weight Reduction, Cravings and Diabetes in GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the Obese

Effects of Fibersol on Weight Reduction

Authors: Marcus Free MD, Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi MD, Waqar Ahmad PhD, Kelly Daly RDN, and Don Juravin (Don Karl Juravin).

Abstract (Research Summary)

  • Fibersol (25 g daily) promotes an increase in Bifidobacteria by ~40% in 51 adults with an inadequate fiber diet over 3 weeks (Burns, 2018). 
  • Fibersol (10 g) increases fullness and delays hunger in 19 (9 men and 10 women) adults for 1.5 to 2 hrs after eating (Ye, 2015).
  • Fibersol (Indigestible Dextrin) is an indigestible dextrin produced from cornstarch containing concentrated soluble dietary fiber (Wolf, 2001).
  • Fibersol reduces the accumulation of body fat and reduces body weight in both healthy and overweight individuals (Wakabayashi, 1995; Wakabayashi, 1992(b); Wakabayashi, 1993; Uno, 1999; Mizushima, 2000).
  • Fibersol reduces sugar cravings by slowing the intestinal phase of nutrient digestion and absorption and therefore attenuates the spike in blood glucose after a meal (Smith, 2011; Slavin, 2007). This decreases the serum glucose and insulin levels and results in fewer cravings (JADA, 2008; Gatti, 1984).

Overview

Fibersol is a digestion-resistant maltodextrin and a low viscosity soluble dietary fiber (90%), drawn from corn starch by proprietary method. Fibersol’s molecular bonds are indigestible, allowing digestion-resistant maltodextrin to be a healthy replacement for sugar in most foods and beverages. Fibersol’s starch linkages remain in the digestive tract, which in turn increases satiety hormones such as peptide YY (PYY) and glucose-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). It boosts essential fibers to food while reducing caloric intake, resulting in fullness for a long period of time. Thus, Fibersol can delay hunger, and ultimately reduce weight. 

Fibersol Effects on Weight Reduction

Fibersol (10 g) is associated with weight loss and a reduction of body fat secondary to decreased release of glucagon.

  • Fibersol (10 g) consumed with a meal stimulates satiety hormones (such as peptide YY and Glucagon-like peptide-1), and delays hunger for up to 2 hours (Ye, 2015). Increased satiety and decreased appetite result in overall decreased ad libitum food intake.
  • Fibersol reduces the accumulation of body fat in both healthy and overweight individuals, regardless of changes in body weight (Wakabayashi, 1995; Wakabayashi, 1992(b); Wakabayashi, 1993; Uno, 1999; Mizushima, 2000).
  • Fibersol intake is inversely associated with body weight and body fat (Slavin, 2005).
  • Fibersol reduces postprandial glucose and insulin peaks (Wakabayashi, 1992a; Wakabayashi, 1992b) resulting in weight loss and decreased body fat (Wakabayashi, 1995).
  • Fibersol reduces the release of glucagon, a hormone which promotes the breakdown of glycogen to glucose and elevates blood glucose (Wakabayashi, 1992). This, therefore, reduces the breakdown of glycogen to glucose resulting in reduced blood glucose levels, better glucose control, and weight loss.

Fibersol Effects on Cravings

Fibersol decreases postprandial glucose response by 50% to 60% and slows intestinal absorption. The slower glucose response leads to a more controlled insulin and dopamine release, therefore reducing cravings caused by the positive feedback reward system. It also increases the healthy gut flora ratio, again resulting in less cravings and further weight loss.

  • Fibersol (25 g daily) promotes an increase in Bifidobacteria by ~40% in 51 adults with an inadequate fiber diet over three weeks. This promotes digestion and optimizes immunity. (Burns, 2018).
  • Fibersol reduces sugar cravings by slowing the intestinal phase of nutrient digestion and absorption, and therefore attenuates the spike in blood glucose after a meal (Smith, 2011; Slavin, 2007). This decreases the serum glucose and insulin levels and results in fewer cravings (JADA, 2008; Gatti, 1984).
  • Fibersol is fermented in the large intestine and therefore increases the ratio of healthy to unhealthy gut flora. Unhealthy gut flora increases cravings for substances to feed them, like sugar (Slavin, 2013; Gibson, 1995). If cravings are satisfied, serotonin and dopamine are released to reward the body (Kim, 2000; Eisenhofer, 1997). This forms a positive feedback loop which encourages more cravings.
  • Fibersol decreases postprandial glucose response by 50% to 60% (Sonoki, 2008). The slower glucose response leads to a more controlled insulin and dopamine response, therefore reducing cravings caused by the positive feedback reward system.
  • Fibersol reduces glucose metabolism, slow glucose release in blood, and reduce insulin secretion postprandially in both healthy and overweight individuals (Unno, 2002; Shioda, 2001; Maeda, 2001; Wolf, 2001; Prosky, 2000; Uno, 1999; Wakabayashi, 1992a). The reduced responses of glucose and insulin increase satiation, and therefore, decrease cravings postprandially.
  • Fibersol is much more likely to reach the lower part of the large intestine due to its slow fermentation, and therefore be utilized by the indigenous gut flora (Slavin, 2013). Feeding and increasing the population of healthy gut flora reduces cravings and improves satiety.
  • Fibersol increases healthy gut flora including lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria (Prosky, 2000; Rodríguez-Cabezas, 2010). This results in decreased sugar cravings as well as enhanced anti-inflammatory and epithelial defense mechanisms in the gut (Rodríguez-Cabezas, 2010).
  • Fibersol increases fecal healthy gut flora such as Bifidobacterium populations by 12% and also increases butyrate in the gut, which is the preferred energy substrate of gut cells (Fastinger, 2008). This increase of healthy gut flora is beneficial for decreasing the body’s need for sugar and increases satiety.

Fibersol Effects on Diabetes

Fibersol slows glucose metabolism, reduces postprandial glucose (by 50% to 60%), and insulin peaks resulting in controlled diabetes, weight loss, and decreased body fat.

  • Fibersol decreases postprandial glucose response by 50% to 60% in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (prediabetes) (Sonoki, 2008).
  • Fibersol slows glucose metabolism by suppressing intestinal hormone secretion and inhibiting digestive enzymes (Tashiro, 1999), resulting in better glucose control in diabetics.
  • Fibersol reduces postprandial glucose and insulin peaks (Wakabayashi, 1992a; Wakabayashi, 1992b) resulting in better-controlled glucose levels, weight loss, and decreased body fat (Wakabayashi, 1995).
  • Fibersol exerts its beneficial effects on glucose metabolism even if added to rapidly digestible starch foods, such as coffee, tofu, soft drinks, rice, and yogurt (Unno, 2002; Shioda, 2001; Maeda, 2001; Sekizaki, 2001; Uno, 1999).
  • Fibersol reduces peak glucose response after sucrose loading (Ueda, 1993; Prosky, 2000).
  • Fibersol alleviates increases in plasma glucose and insulin levels after a high sucrose diet. It also reduces the accumulation of body fat (Wakabayashi, 1995).
  • Fibersol decreases the glycemic index in diabetics (Kimura, 2013).

Benefits, Side Effects, Drug Interactions

Benefits

  • The most effective dose of Fibersol to improve glucose metabolism and insulin release is 0.15 g per kg (Wakabayashi, 1993). For an average individual of 260 lbs (118 kg), this would be 17.7 g per day.
  • Fibersol, as a dietary supplement, prevents the mechanism associated with colorectal cancer (So, 2015).
  • The required daily fiber intake recommendations may be difficult to obtain through diet alone (Wakabayashi, 1999). Dietary fiber supplements, such as Fibersol, are therefore a promising dietary addition.

Safety

Fibersol is Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) according to the Journal of Cancer Biology and Therapy.

Side effects

  • Flatulence: Fibersol may increase gas production in the large intestine resulting in increased flatulence.

Drug interactions

  • Antidiabetic drugs: As both Fibersol and antidiabetic drugs decrease blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels and speak to a physician about decreasing the antidiabetic drugs if required.

Caution

  • Diarrhea: As Fibersol increases gastric motility, it should be used with caution in those suffering diarrhea.
  • Diabetes: As Fibersol lowers blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor sugar levels to avoid hypoglycemic episodes.

References

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Footnote

This research was sponsored by GLOBESITY FOUNDATION (nonprofit organization) and managed by Don Juravin. GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the obese is part of GLOBESITY FOUNDATION which helps obese with 70 to 400 lbs excess fat to adopt a healthy lifestyle and thereby achieve a healthy weight.

Tags: Fibersol, healthy gut bacteria, prebiotic, GLOBESITY FOUNDATION, weight loss, weight reduction, healthy weight, diabetes, food craving, cravings

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3972071