GLOBESITY FOUNDATION – Healthy Life Bootcamp

Home » Coffea Arabica Effects on Weight Reduction, Cravings and Diabetes in GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the Obese

Coffea Arabica Effects on Weight Reduction, Cravings and Diabetes in GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the Obese

Effects of Coffea Arabica on Weight Reduction

Authors: Marcus Free MD, Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi MD, Waqar Ahmad PhD, Kelly Daly RDN, and Don Juravin (Don Karl Juravin).

Abstract (Research Summary)

  • Coffea Arabica Linn. (mostly referred to as Coffea Arabica, aka Green coffee bean) extract is rich in chlorogenic acid (Craig 2016, Shimoda 2006).
  • Coffea Arabica (700mg to 1050mg per day) reduces body weight by ~2.5 kg (~5.5 lbs) (Onakpoya 2011, Stohs 2016) to 8 kg (~17.5 lbs) over 22 weeks in obese and overweight individuals (Vinson 2012).
  • Coffea Arabica (0.5% to 1%) consumed for 13 days reduces visceral fat content and body weight, inhibits fat absorption, and activates fat metabolism in the liver (Shimoda 2006).
  • Coffea Arabica has intrinsic weight-losing and thermogenic properties which increase the resting metabolic rate by 3% to 4% in both lean and obese individuals (Dulloo 1989, Yoshida 1994, Bracco 1995).
  • Coffea Arabica reduces the absorption of glucose from the digestive tract, thus lowering blood glucose levels and controlling insulin spikes (Johnston 2003, van Dijk 2009, Hemmerle 1997, Abrahão 2013).
  • Coffea Arabica (1g) significantly reduces glucose (by 0.7 mmol/l) and insulin (by 73 pmol/l) concentrations and inhibits gluconeogenesis (Van Dijk 2009, Ong 2012).

Coffea Arabica Effects on Weight Reduction

Coffea Arabica reduces body weight (by 2.5 kg to 8 kg (5.5 lbs to 17.6 lbs)), BMI (by 2.9), and body fat (by 4.5%) through inhibiting fat absorption and activating fat metabolism.

  • Coffea Arabica (700mg to 1050mg daily) reduces body weight by 2.5 kg (5.5 lbs) to 8 kg (~17.5 lbs), body mass index (BMI) by 2.9, and body fat by ~4.5% over 22 weeks in obese and overweight individuals (Vinson 2012, Onakpoya 2011).
  • Coffea Arabica (0.5% to 1%) reduces visceral fat content, body weight, and serum triglyceride level, inhibits fat absorption, and activates fat metabolism in the liver when consumed for 13 days (Shimoda 2006).
  • Coffea Arabica decreases weight (by 2.8 kg (6.1 lbs)) and fat mass and increases fat-free mass over 60 days when combined with a dietary regimen (Stohs 2016).
  • Coffea Arabica increases lipolysis in adipocytes of overweight individuals both short-term and long-term (Flanagan 2014).
  • Coffea Arabica reverses high fat diet-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis in visceral adipose (fat) tissue (Song 2014), promoting weight loss.
  • Coffea Arabica has intrinsic weight-losing and thermogenic properties which increase the resting metabolic rate by 3% to 4% in both lean and obese individuals for 150 minutes post-ingestion (Dulloo 1989, Yoshida 1994, Bracco 1995).

Coffea Arabica Effects on Diabetes

Coffea Arabica reduces insulin resistance and glucose absorption, lowering blood glucose levels and controlling insulin spikes in diabetics.

  • Coffea Arabica reduces the absorption of glucose from the digestive tract, lowering blood glucose levels, and controlling insulin spikes (Johnston 2003, van Dijk 2009, Hemmerle 1997, Abrahão 2013).
  • Coffea Arabica (1g) reduces glucose (by 0.7 mmol/l) and insulin (by 73 pmol/l) concentrations and inhibits gluconeogenesis (Van Dijk 2009, Ong 2012).
  • Coffea Arabica has a potent antagonistic effect on glucose transport by attenuating intestinal glucose absorption rates and shifting the site of glucose absorption to more distal parts of the intestine (Johnston 2003, Bassoli 2008).
  • Coffea Arabica reduces insulin resistance in visceral adipose (fat) tissue (Song 2014), promoting blood glucose control.
  • Coffea Arabica supplementation for 40 days reduces postprandial glucose levels by ~14 mg/dL (Blum 2007), therefore making it easier to manage blood glucose and reduce the need for anti-diabetic medications.
  • Coffea Arabica has potential benefits in treating insulin resistance and related conditions in diabetics (Hua 2015).

Benefits, Side Effects, Drug Interactions

Benefits

  • Coffea Arabica improves cognitive health, protects the cardiovascular system, reduces the chances of developing diabetes, aids in weight loss efforts, boosts energy levels, and optimizes metabolism (Butt 2011).

Safety

Coffea Arabica is Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) according to FDA.

Side effects

  • Sleep disturbances: Coffea Arabica may decrease sleep quantity and quality.
  • Headaches: Coffea Arabica may cause withdrawal headaches, especially in heavy consumers.
  • Mood changes: Coffea Arabica may cause or worsen anxiety.
  • Stomach upset: Coffea Arabica may cause an abdominal upset.
  • Palpitation: Coffea Arabica may increase heart rate and palpitation.

Drug interactions

  • Antidiabetic drugs: As both Coffea Arabica and anti-diabetic drugs decrease blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels and speak to a physician about decreasing the antidiabetic drugs if required.
  • Antiplatelets (aspirin, etc.): Coffea Arabica may increase the potency of antiplatelet drugs.
  • Antihypertensive drugs: Coffea Arabica may counteract the effects of antihypertensive drugs.

Caution

  • Pregnancy and breastfeeding: Coffea Arabica is probably safe during pregnancy, however, there is limited research and therefore best to avoid during pregnancy or breastfeeding.
  • Diabetes: As Coffea Arabica lowers blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels to avoid hypoglycemic episodes.
  • Glaucoma: Coffea Arabica should be used with caution in individuals with glaucoma.
  • Anxiety: Individuals with anxiety should consult a physician before use.
  • Osteoporosis: Excessive Coffea Arabica may aggravate osteoporosis and should be used cautiously in these individuals.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): Coffea Arabica may change bowel habits and should be used with caution in individuals with IBS.
  • Heart disease: Coffea Arabica may be unsafe in individuals with heart disease.
  • Hypertension: Coffea Arabica may cause transient rises in blood pressure and should be used with caution in these individuals.
  • Bleeding disorders: Coffea Arabica may worsen preexisting bleeding disorders.

References

  1. Abrahão, S., Pereira, R., de Sousa, R., et al. (2013). Influence of Coffee Brew in Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition [online], 68 (2), pp. 184-9. Available from: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11130-013-0355-z [Accessed 13.06.2016]. 
  2. Bassoli, B., Cassolla, P., Borba-Murad, G., et al. (2008). Chlorogenic acid reduces the plasma glucose peak in the oral glucose tolerance test: effects on hepatic glucose release and glycaemia. Cell Biochemistry and Function [online], 26 (3), pp. 320-8. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17990295 [Accessed 13.06.2016]. 
  3. Blum, J., Lemaire, B., Lafay, S. (2007). Effect of a green decaffeinated coffee extract on glycemia: A pilot prospective clinical study. Nutra Foods [online], 6 (3), pp. 13-7. Available from: http://www.nuvocare.us/assets/pdf/WeightOFF_Svetol%20Blood%20Sugar%20Study.pdf [Accessed 13.06.2016]. 
  4. Bracco, D., Ferrarra, J., Arnaud, M., et al. (1995). Effects of caffeine on energy metabolism, heart rate, and methylxanthine metabolism in lean and obese women. The American Journal of Physiology [online], 269 (4 part 1), pp. E671-8. Available from: http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/269/4/E671.short [Accessed 07.06.2016]. 
  5. Butt, M., Sultan, M. (2011). Coffee and its consumption: benefits and risks. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition [online], 51 (4), pp. 363-73. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10408390903586412?journalCode=bfsn20#.V2PQDZD3arU [Accessed 17.06.2016].
  6. Craig, A., Fields, C., Liang, N., et al. (2016). Performance review of a fast HPLC-UV method for the quantification of chlorogenic acids in green coffee bean extracts. Talanta [online], 154, pp. 481-5. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0039914016302399?via%3Dihub [Accessed 06.06.2016].
  7. Dulloo, A., Geissler, C., Horton, T., et al. (1989). Normal caffeine consumption: influence on thermogenesis and daily energy expenditure in lean and postobese human volunteers. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [online], 49 (1), pp. 44-50. Available from: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/49/1/44.short [Accessed 07.06.2016]. 
  8. Flanagan, J., Bily, A., Rolland, Y., et al. (2014). Lipolytic activity of Svetol®, a decaffeinated green coffee bean extract. Phytotherapy Research [online], 28 (6): pp. 946-8. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ptr.5085/abstract;jsessionid=5AA58292D8DA8FD344D847DA78249B57.f01t03 [Accessed 06.06.2016].
  9. Hemmerle, H., Burger, H., Below, P., et al. (1997). Chlorogenic acid and synthetic chlorogenic acid derivatives: novel inhibitors of hepatic glucose-6-phosphate translocase. Journal of Medical Chemistry [online], 40 (2), pp. 137-45. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9003513/ [Accessed 13.06.2016]. 
  10. Hua, Y., Ren, S., Guo, R., et al. (2015). Furostanolic saponins from Trigonella foenum-graecum alleviate diet-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic fat accumulation. Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, [online], 59 (10), pp. 2094-100. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26201993 [Accessed 06.06.2016].
  11. Johnston, K., Clifford, M., Morgan, L. (2003). Coffee acutely modifies gastrointestinal hormone secretion and glucose tolerance in humans: glycemic effects of chlorogenic acid and caffeine. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [online], 78 (4), pp. 728-33. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14522730 [Accessed 13.06.2016]. 
  12. Onakpoya, I., Terry, R., Ernst, E. (2011). The use of green coffee extract as a weight loss supplement: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. Gastroenterology Research and Practice [online], 2011, pp. 382852-65. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2943088/ [Accessed 06.06.2016].
  13. Ong, K., Hsu, A., Tan, B., et al. (2012). Chlorogenic Acid Stimulates Glucose Transport in Skeletal Muscle via AMPK Activation: A Contributor to the Beneficial Effects of Coffee on Diabetes. Plos One [online], 7 (3), pp. E32718. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0032718 [Accessed 13.06.2016]. 
  14. Shimoda, H., Seki, E., Aitani, M. (2006). Inhibitory effect of green coffee bean extract on fat accumulation and body weight gain in mice. BMC Complementary Alternative Medicine [online], 6, pp. 9-27. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1513603/ [Accessed 06.06.2016].
  15. Song, S., Choi, S., Park, T. (2014). Decaffeinated green coffee bean extract attenuates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice. Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine [online], pp. 718379-408. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4003760/ [Accessed 06.06.2016]. 
  16. Stohs, S., Kaats, G., Preuss, H. (2016). Safety and Efficacy of Banaba-Moringa oleifera-Green Coffee Bean Extracts and Vitamin D3 in a Sustained Release Weight Management Supplement.
    Phytotherapy Research [online]. 30 (4), pp. 681-8. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26871553 [Accessed 06.06.2016].
  17. Van Dijk, A., Olthof, M., Meeuse, J., et al. (2009). Acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance. Diabetes Care [online], 32 (6), pp. 1023-5. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19324944 [Accessed 13.06.2016]. 
  18. Vinson, J., Burnham, B., Nagendran, M. (2012). Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, linear dose, crossover study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a green coffee bean extract in overweight subjects. Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy [online], 5, pp. 21-7. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3267522/#!po=2.27273 [Accessed 06.06.2016]. 
  19. Yoshida, T., Sakane, N., Umekawa, T., et al. (1994). Relationship between basal metabolic rate, thermogenic response to caffeine, and body weight loss following combined low calorie and exercise treatment in obese women. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders [online], 18 (5), pp. 345-50. Available from: http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/8061728/ [Accessed 07.06.2016]. 

Footnote

This research was sponsored by GLOBESITY FOUNDATION (nonprofit organization) and managed by Don Juravin. GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the obese is part of GLOBESITY FOUNDATION which helps obese with 70 to 400 lbs excess fat to adopt a healthy lifestyle and thereby achieve a healthy weight.

Tags: coffea arabica, weight reduction, GLOBESITY FOUNDATION, weight loss, cravings, diabetes, healthy weight