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Cayenne Pepper Effects on Weight Reduction, Cravings and Diabetes in GLOBESITY Bootcamp

Effects of Cayenne Pepper on Weight Reduction

Authors: Marcus Free MD, Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi MD, Waqar Ahmad PhD, Kelly Daly RDN, and Don Juravin (Don Karl Juravin).

Abstract (Research Summary)

  • Cayenne pepper (aka Capsicum Annum or Paprika, active ingredient: capsaicinoid) is a hot chili pepper in the Capsicum family.
  • Cayenne pepper (11g with each meal) and caffeine (200mg with each meal) consumption significantly reduce the cumulative ad libitum energy intake and increase energy expenditure. The mean difference in energy balance between both conditions is ~960 calories per day (Yoshioka 2001). Reduction of 960 calories per day in a standard 2000 calorie diet is expected to result in a weight loss of 2 kg (4.8 lbs) per week.
  • Cayenne pepper supplementation significantly decreases weight by 2% and fat mass by 7.8%, and increases lean mass by 3.4%, when taken with raspberry ketone, caffeine, garlic, ginger, and Citrus aurantium over 8 weeks (Lopez 2013).
  • In an average 118 kg (260 lb) client, this is 2.4 kg (5.3 lbs) weight loss, 9.2 kg (20 lbs) fat loss, and 4 kg (8.8 lbs) increase in lean mass.
  • Cayenne pepper reduces postprandial blood glucose levels by 10% (Ahuja 2006).
  • Cayenne pepper increases insulin secretion, therefore helping to remove glucose from the blood postprandially and improving overall glycaemic control (Tolan 2001).

Cayenne Pepper Effects on Weight Reduction

Cayenne pepper significantly reduces weight (by 2%) and fat mass (by 7.8%) by increasing energy expenditure (by 13%) and decreasing ad libitum food intake resulting in ~960 calorie deficit per day. In an average 118 kg (260 lb) client, this is 2.4 kg (5.3 lbs) weight loss, 9.2 kg (20 lbs) fat loss, and 4 kg (8.8 lbs) increase in lean mass.

  • Cayenne pepper supplementation significantly decreases weight by 2% and fat mass by 7.8%, and increases lean mass by 3.4%, when taken with raspberry ketone, caffeine, garlic, ginger, and Citrus aurantium over 8 weeks (Lopez 2013). In an average 118 kg (260 lb) client, this is 2.4 kg (5.3 lbs) weight loss, 9.2 kg (20 lbs) fat loss, and 4 kg (8.8 lbs) increase in lean mass.
  • Cayenne pepper (11g with each meal) and caffeine (200mg with each meal) consumption significantly reduces the cumulative ad libitum energy intake and increases energy expenditure. The mean difference in energy balance between both conditions is ~960 calories per day (Yoshioka 2001). Reduction of 960 calories per day in a standard 2000 calorie diet is expected to result in a weight loss of 2 kg (4.8 lbs) per week.
  • Cayenne pepper consumption increases core body temperature slightly, which in turn burns an additional 10 calories 4 hours postprandially (Ludy 2011). By heating the body, the natural process of detoxification is streamlined.
  • Cayenne pepper (0.9mg) consumed with meals reduces energy intake by up to ~74 calories per meal (Whiting 2014), or up to 240 calories per day (Westerp-Plantenga 2005). This results in 500g (1.1 lb) weight loss per week, and 22 kg (48 lb) weight loss per year.
  • Cayenne pepper increases energy expenditure by 50 calories per day producing significant weight loss in 1 to 2 years (Whiting 2012). Regular consumption significantly reduces abdominal adipose tissue levels and reduces appetite and energy intake (Whiting 2012).
  • Cayenne pepper works synergistically with caffeine to increase energy expenditure by 13% and has been proposed to counteract the decrease in metabolic rate that often accompanies weight loss (Diepvens 2007).
  • Cayenne pepper consumption increases energy expenditure, lipolysis, and fat oxidation and activates brown adipose tissue (Yoneshiro 2012, Josse 2010, Bloomer 2010).
  • Cayenne pepper increases energy expenditure and fat burning, particularly in those with a higher BMI (Inoue 2007, Lejeune 2003, Yoshioka 1995).
  • Cayenne pepper, when consumed prior to a meal, significantly reduces caloric intake for a few hours post-ingestion (Yoshioka 1999). Therefore, consuming Cayenne pepper before each main meal would significantly reduce total energy intake throughout the day.
  • Cayenne pepper promotes negative energy balance, meaning that it takes more energy to digest the food than what the food contains (Yoshioka 1995, 1999, 2001, 2004, Matsumoto 2000, Chaiyata 2003, Lejeune 2003, Westerterp-Plantenga 2005; Ahuja 2006, Reinbach 2009; Smeets 2009, Ludy 2011).

Cayenne Pepper Effects on Cravings

Cayenne pepper reduces cravings by 13.9% as a result of improved glycaemic control and reduced ghrelin levels.

  • Cayenne pepper increases energy levels by 29.3% and decreases cravings by 13.9% when taken with raspberry ketone, caffeine, garlic, ginger, and Citrus aurantium over 8 weeks (Lopez 2013).
  • Cayenne pepper improves glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in obese patients which helps to normalize glucose levels and decrease cravings (Yang 2012).
  • Cayenne pepper slows glucose absorption and reduces the feelings of excessive hunger due to its hot taste (Monsereenusorn 1980).
  • Cayenne pepper decreases ghrelin levels (Smeets 2009). Ghrelin promotes the synthesis of Neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is one of the most potent appetite stimulators and increases cravings (Faulconbridge 2003).

Cayenne Pepper Effects on Diabetes

Cayenne pepper reduces postprandial blood glucose levels by 10% resulting in improved glucose control and decreased risk of long-term complications.

  • Cayenne pepper reduces postprandial blood glucose levels by 10% (Ahuja 2006).
  • Cayenne pepper may be useful for preventing diabetes as it exhibits antidiabetic effects via activation of PPAR-y and AMPK (Yang 2012).
  • Cayenne pepper significantly improves glucose tolerance resulting in improved glucose control and decreased risk of long-term complications (Kwon 2013, Chaiyata 2003).
  • Cayenne pepper increases insulin secretion, therefore helping to remove glucose from the blood postprandially and improving overall glycaemic control (Tolan 2001).
  • Cayenne pepper slows intestinal glucose absorption postprandially, resulting in better glycemic control and improved insulin sensitivity (Monsereenusorn 1980).

Benefits, Side Effects, Drug Interactions

Benefits

  • Cayenne pepper exerts multiple pharmacological and physiological effects including the activities of anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-obesity (Luo 2011). Cayenne pepper stimulates the digestive tract, increasing the flow of enzyme production and gastric juices. This aids the body’s ability to metabolize food and toxins.
  • Cayenne pepper reduces bloating by stimulating intestinal peristaltic motion, aiding in both assimilation and elimination of gas (Kim 2003).

Safety

Cayenne pepper is Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) by the International Journal of Toxicology.

Side effects

  • Abdominal discomfort: Cayenne pepper may cause a slightly upset stomach.

Drug interactions

  • Antidiabetic drugs: As both Cayenne pepper and antidiabetic drugs decrease blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels and speak to a physician about decreasing the antidiabetic drugs if required.
  • Anticoagulants: Taking Cayenne pepper with medications which slow blood clotting will increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.
  • Theophylline: Cayenne pepper may increase the effects and side effects of Theophylline.

Caution

  • Diabetes: As Guar gum lowers blood glucose levels, it is important to monitor glucose levels to avoid hypoglycemic episodes.

References

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Footnote

This research was sponsored by GLOBESITY FOUNDATION (nonprofit organization) and managed by Don Juravin. GLOBESITY Bootcamp for the obese is part of GLOBESITY FOUNDATION which helps obese with 70 to 400 lbs excess fat to adopt a healthy lifestyle and thereby achieve a healthy weight.

Tags: cayenne pepper, weight reduction, GLOBESITY FOUNDATION, weight loss, cravings, diabetes, healthy weight